Kaelin’s game

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2018-03-28T05:24:14+01:00Wed, 28th Mar '18, 05:24|0 Comments

Read this blog post by Freddy Gray on The Spectator.

He’s right. The real story on Cambridge Analytica is not so much the advice they gave to their clients. The big story is how Henley and Partners’s Christian Kaelin used Cambridge Analytica to virtually own political leaders they secured the election of.

Alexander Nix, formerly of Cambridge Analytica

In the next few days I will be providing details of Henley and Partners clients who obtained passports on the request of Cambridge Analytica as part of their work advising political parties on how to win elections right or wrong.

The list will show how deep, extensive and global is the relationship between the two men and their organisations. Of course since the scandal broke out, Alexander Nix no longer runs Cambridge Analytica. Christian Kaelin was and remains Henley and Partners.

The work done by SCL — Cambridge Analytica’s mother company — in Caribbean jurisdictions where Henley and Partners had or eventually would secure citizenship-selling programs is well documented. Daphne Caruana Galizia had written about it. And Freddy Gray comments on it here.

Christian Kaelin of Henley and Partners

I have spoken yesterday with a former employee of SCL that has confirmed to me that the company worked on advising Nicos Anastasiades, President of Cyprus since 2013 before his re-election in last month’s elections. SCL provided consultancy services advising Nicos Anastasiades on how to defeat soundly his political opponent.

However no public record whatsoever exists of such an engagement or activity in that country.

If you have seen Channel 4’s exposé on the activities of Cambridge Analytica, you will have seen Cambridge Analytica officials carefully explain to the journalists pretending to be potential clients from Sri Lanka that Cambridge Analytica would use special purpose vehicles to bill for its services so that their support would never be known of in the constituency in which they work.

“No one will know”.